The Reality Of Cold War Politics In The North-East Of Ireland

From 1995 to 2001 an organisation calling itself Direct Action Against Drugs, or DAAD, was involved in a series of “vigilante-style” attacks on a number of criminals and underworld gangs in the north-east of Ireland. The various assaults, involving the use of guns, bombs and so-called “punishment beatings”, took place against the background of the Irish-British… Read More The Reality Of Cold War Politics In The North-East Of Ireland

The Colonist-Deniers Of Irish And British History

Speaking of that generation of academics, writers and journalists who have formed the core of what we might call the “colonist-deniers” of Irish historical studies, here is regular columnist Archon writing for the Southern Star newspaper on the attempts by some revisionist ideologues to alter the record of the Fenian revolutionary Jeremiah O’Donovan Rossa: “Indeed, the effort to blacken… Read More The Colonist-Deniers Of Irish And British History

John Redmond MP The Gun-Loving German-Shooting Pacifist

Just after midnight on the 15th of August 1915 several armed and masked men forced their way into the London and North Western Railway Depot in the North Wall district of Dublin and proceeded to load four large crates from one of the warehouses onto a number of motor vehicles before disappearing into the early morning darkness. Press reports over the following days claimed that… Read More John Redmond MP The Gun-Loving German-Shooting Pacifist

American Journalism Fails The Irish Test Once Again

Kurt Eichenwald is a veteran American journalist of some thirty years standing who has specialised in everything from corporate malfeasance to defence issues for publications as diverse as the New York Times and Vanity Fair. For the last year he has been authoring a series of investigatory or analytical pieces for the current affairs magazine Newsweek, some of… Read More American Journalism Fails The Irish Test Once Again

A’ Seinn An Aghaidh Na Balbhachd

A quick thank you to regular contributor Marconatrix for an email reminder of this 2012 video-documentary from Michael Newton, A’ Seinn an aghaidh na Balbhachd “Singing against the Silence”, examining the Scottish (Scottish Gaelic) language in Nova Scotia and Canada. It’s well worth half an hour of your time.  

Hiroshima And Nagasaki 70 Years On

By any rational appraisal the deployment of nuclear weapons against the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on the 6th and 9th of August 1945 clearly fell under the definition of crimes against humanity. Over one hundred thousand were killed and hundreds of thousands more were injured or otherwise effected by the long-lasting physical and psychological effects of the bombings. Combating and… Read More Hiroshima And Nagasaki 70 Years On

British Reparations For British Crimes In Ireland And India

Shashi Tharoor, the noted Indian politician and author, delivers some home truths on the murderous nature of the British Empire to the Oxford Union and the long shadow it has cast over its former colonies. Substitute “Ireland” for “India” in Tharoor’s arguments and most of these hard facts would still apply. We are told by the… Read More British Reparations For British Crimes In Ireland And India

Ireland And Catalonia, Some Historic Parallels

In the general election of December 1918 the revolutionary Irish republican and nationalist party, Sinn Féin, took 73 of the available 105 seats allocated to Ireland in the House of Commons, the parliament of the so-called “United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland”. The Irish Parliamentary Party, a nationalist-regionalist grouping favouring some form of quasi-autonomy… Read More Ireland And Catalonia, Some Historic Parallels

Lá Lúghnasa Agus Diarmaid Ó Donnabháin Rossa

A belated happy Lá Lúghnasa to one and all as we celebrate the traditional harvest festival marking the commencement of the third quarter of the year in the indigenous calendars of Ireland and the Gaelic world. Unfortunately my day has as been consumed with rather more contemporary work, leaving me little time for festivities. However it’s pleasing to note… Read More Lá Lúghnasa Agus Diarmaid Ó Donnabháin Rossa

Super Colonised Irish Syndrome

  In today’s Irish Times newspaper Seaghán Mac an tSionnaigh reviews the latest in a wave of books from a new generation of writers and historians challenging the inferior position of Ireland’s indigenous language, and the conventional narratives which have shaped our understanding of the suppression – and extermination – of those who speak it: “In The Broken Harp, Identity and… Read More Super Colonised Irish Syndrome

The Hooded Men, British Torture-Centres In Ireland

The Irish Times has a laudably detailed article examining the historic issue of the “Hooded Men”: Irish citizens detained by the British and unionist authorities in the north-east of Ireland during the period of internment – imprisonment without charge or trial – in the early 1970s. Unlike some two thousand others who were carted off to… Read More The Hooded Men, British Torture-Centres In Ireland

British Spies In The IRA, Myth Versus Reality

Just a quick heads-up for those who have access to the series “Twentieth Century British History” from the Oxford Journals. A recent edition features an article titled “The Influence of Informers and Agents on Provisional Irish Republican Army Military Strategy and British Counter-Insurgency Strategy, 1976–94” by Thomas Leahy of King’s College, London. In it the researcher pretty… Read More British Spies In The IRA, Myth Versus Reality

The INLA Show Of Strength In The City Of Derry

      Following the recent death of Peggy O’Hara, the veteran political activist in the city of Derry, the Irish Republican Socialist Party and the Irish National Liberation Army – the IRSP’s largely quiescent military wing – staged an unusual public show of strength at her funeral, drawing much media attention and commentary. O’Hara was the mother of the late Patsy O’Hara, the INLA leader who died… Read More The INLA Show Of Strength In The City Of Derry

A Sordid Tale Of British Gunmen, Bombers And Policemen

In his final exploration of the evidence sourced for the RTÉ television documentary “Collusion”, a feature-length programme examining the links between the UK military and intelligence services garrisoned in the north-east of Ireland during the period of the “Long War” and their allies in the so-called “Loyalist” terrorist gangs, veteran Irish journalist Ed Moloney begins with a story that coincidentally illustrates the easy relationship that existed between the… Read More A Sordid Tale Of British Gunmen, Bombers And Policemen

Shoot-To-Kill, Britain’s Summary Executions And Assassinations In Ireland

Sometimes I do wonder if the dozens of Irish and British journalists who spent most of their careers loftily dismissing the evidence of Britain’s criminal counter-insurgency war in Ireland as “republican propaganda” have any regrets now that the veracity of those allegations has been proven to be correct? Or do those newspaper columnists, press editors and… Read More Shoot-To-Kill, Britain’s Summary Executions And Assassinations In Ireland

The Reorganisation Of The IRA In The Early 1970s

Irish journalist and author Ed Moloney, now resident in New York, has an interesting article over on his Broken Elbow blog examining possible evidence of the reorganisation of the (Provisional) Irish Republican Army into a “cellular” command and control structure primarily based upon Active Service Units (ASUs) at a date much earlier than previously thought. “Way… Read More The Reorganisation Of The IRA In The Early 1970s

Irish Is Not Dying, Irish Is Being Killed

When the greater part of Ireland won its independence from the United Kingdom in the early 1920s the number of native Irish-speakers across the island, north and south, was close to 6% of the total population (a figure which excludes fluent non-native speakers of Irish, perhaps another 3%-5%). This represented over 250,000 men, women and children, the vast… Read More Irish Is Not Dying, Irish Is Being Killed

Dylann Roof, The Last Rhodesian – Or Ulsterman

In the wake of the racially-motivated massacre at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina, by Dylann Roof, a self-proclaimed Far Right militant with a fondness for the former regimes of apartheid-era South Africa and white-minority-rule Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe), I was reminded of those in the leadership of the British unionist minority in the north-east of Ireland who once expressed similar feelings of… Read More Dylann Roof, The Last Rhodesian – Or Ulsterman

The British Army’s “Tuzo Plan” Of 1972

Over on the Broken Elbow blog the veteran Irish journalist Ed Moloney has a detailed examination of the British Army’s so-called “Tuzo Plan“, named after its originator General Sir Harry Craufurd Tuzo. If the strategy had been implemented in 1972 it would have seen the UK Forces in Ireland and their counterparts in the British terror factions co-operating… Read More The British Army’s “Tuzo Plan” Of 1972