Baron Roman Nikolai Maximilian Von Ungern-Sternberg

The Atlantic has a fascinating article on a little known, early 20th century warlord who once terrified Mongolia and neighbouring regions of Russia and China. Baron Roman Nikolai Maximilian von Ungern-Sternberg, a scion of the Deutsch-Balten or Baltic German nobility, aligned himself with the “White Russian” faction during Russia’s communist revolution and counter-revolution of 1917 to 1922, eventually leading a rag-bag… Read More Baron Roman Nikolai Maximilian Von Ungern-Sternberg

Bessie Coleman

Elizabeth “Bessie” Coleman was a young pilot of Native- and African-American descent who became something of a minor press sensation in the United States during the 1920s where she earned a living as a “barnstorming” stunt flier in fairs and exhibitions across the country. With trips to France, the Netherlands and Germany, “Queen Bess“, as she was publicised, seems to have been a… Read More Bessie Coleman

The Shankill Bombing And Britain’s Proxy-War In Belfast

Just after 1 pm on the afternoon of Saturday the 23rd of October 1993, Thomas Begley and Seán Kelly, two volunteers of the 3rd Battalion of the Belfast Brigade of the (Provisional) Irish Republican Army, entered Frizzell’s, a busy two-storey fishmonger’s shop on the Shankill Road, a traditionally pro-UK or unionist enclave in the nationalist west of the… Read More The Shankill Bombing And Britain’s Proxy-War In Belfast

Headquarters Of The Fenian Brotherhood of America, New York City

In the latter half of 1865, the Fenian Brotherhood of America (FBA), the formerly clandestine Irish revolutionary organisation in the United States and Canada, spent the modern equivalent of some $3.5 million dollars on moving its headquarters from a modest address at 22 Duane Street, New York City, to a prestige location at Moffat Mansion, 32 East 17th Street,… Read More Headquarters Of The Fenian Brotherhood of America, New York City

Dublin, Easter 1916, Their Sympathies Were With The Rebels

I’ve made reference before to one of the great myths of the Easter Rising of 1916. That is, the absence of popular support among the broad swathe of the Irish people for the failed national insurrection, indeed the hostility and opposition that folk memory insists was universal across the island. Unfortunately communal history is as susceptible to… Read More Dublin, Easter 1916, Their Sympathies Were With The Rebels

Swimming To Cambodia

Many years ago, discouraged by the need to go to school the next day, and unable to read, let alone sleep, I spent much of the night flicking through the television channels on the second-hand TV in my bedroom desperate for something to watch, anything to distract me from the black moods which characterized much of my teenage years. If I were to sum up that entire decade… Read More Swimming To Cambodia

The African-American And Irish Civil Rights Movements

From NBC News, an article by Chandra Thomas Whitfield examining the influence of the African-American civil rights movement on its Irish counterpart in the UK administrated north-east of Ireland during the 1960s and early ’70s: “It was a Sunday afternoon in January. Hundreds gathered to protest what they considered rampant injustices in the criminal justice system. Linked arm-and-arm,… Read More The African-American And Irish Civil Rights Movements

The Fantasy History Of The 1916 Easter Rising

Liam Kennedy is a professor of economic and social history at Queen’s University Belfast, which is somewhat shocking given that he seems to have, at best, a passing familiarity with the latter half of his chosen speciality. Here he is in the Irish Independent, salami-slicing Irish history to suit his particular tastes. A little bit of this,… Read More The Fantasy History Of The 1916 Easter Rising

More On The Artist Seaghán Mac Cathmhaoil Or John P. Campbell

My post yesterday on an eyewitness account of the Easter Rising of 1916, published some three months after the insurrection by the New York Times Magazine, drew a good response and I’m glad so many of you enjoyed it. However quite a few readers enquired about the Irish artist, John Patrick Campbell, who normally signed his work as Seaghán Mac Cathmhaoil, occasionally using Ogham… Read More More On The Artist Seaghán Mac Cathmhaoil Or John P. Campbell

Think Tanks And Policy Institutes, Politics And War By Other Means

The centrist US news and current affairs website, The Atlantic, features a prominent article by H.A. Hellyer, a security-analyst with the Royal United Services Institution, a conservative foreign policy group in Britain linked to the UK Armed Forces, where he describes the (Provisional) Irish Republican Army as a: “…Catholic organization insofar as it used Catholic identity for political ends, cultivating… Read More Think Tanks And Policy Institutes, Politics And War By Other Means

An Irish Girl Rebel And The American Poet Joyce Kilmer

I thought some readers of An Sionnach Fionn might be interested in this interview, originally published in The New York Times Magazine on Sunday, August 20th 1916, describing an eyewitness account of the Easter Rising in Dublin by Moira Regan, a member of Cumann na mBan (CnamB), the Irish republican-feminist organisation. The young woman seems to have served as a messenger… Read More An Irish Girl Rebel And The American Poet Joyce Kilmer

Dissident Republicans With Their Rockets And Their Guns

Did someone mention, “general election“? With April the 8th serving as the legal cut-off point for the holding of the next Dáil vote things are beginning to get a wee bit tense, almost excitable, in Irish politics. Perhaps not entirely unrelated to this is the decision by An Garda Síochána to stage a presentation of arms and equipment seized from “Dissident” or “Resistance… Read More Dissident Republicans With Their Rockets And Their Guns

Captain Robert Nairac, Britain’s Death Squad Adventurer

2016 may be the centenary of the Easter Rising of 1916, and some journalists employed by the main titles of the Independent News & Media organisation may be half-heartedly mimicking a more liberal tone, but the old hands of the IN&M newsrooms remain true believers in a manipulative view of Ireland’s history which makes savage natives of the Irish, and civilizing colonists of the British. So there… Read More Captain Robert Nairac, Britain’s Death Squad Adventurer

Majority Of Irish DNA May Have Originated In The Middle East And Eastern Europe

I’m sure some of you may have seen the recent flurry of articles in the national and international press highlighting the publication of a new genetics’ study, “Neolithic and Bronze Age migration to Ireland and establishment of the insular Atlantic genome“, by academics from Trinity College Dublin and Queen’s University Belfast. The examination of the DNA profiles of four… Read More Majority Of Irish DNA May Have Originated In The Middle East And Eastern Europe

The Neo-Celtic Architectural Revival That Wasn’t

Most observers agree that the applicability of the term “Celtic architecture” is largely a matter of perception since no such tradition of building design has survived into the modern or pre-modern eras, or at least none that can be labelled as authentically Celtic in origin. Indeed what defines a particular construction and artistic style as “Celtic” is itself debatable in light… Read More The Neo-Celtic Architectural Revival That Wasn’t

Licio Gelli, The Fascist Spider At The Heart Of Italy’s Right-Wing Web

The problem with conspiracy theories is that every now and again one of them turns out to be true. That is certainly the case with the conservative Propaganda Due, or P2, a decades-old Masonic lodge in Italy whose members were implicated in range of political scandals from the 1960s to ’90s. These included the collapse of the Banco Ambrosiano in 1982 (the so-called “Vatican Bank”),… Read More Licio Gelli, The Fascist Spider At The Heart Of Italy’s Right-Wing Web

Trolling The Brits For Lolz

A further display of idiotic, post-imperial amnesia by our neighbours across the Irish Sea in this report from The Journal.ie: “ANOTHER AWARDS NOMINATION announcement, another hames made of calling Irish people ‘British’. This time it’s the London Film Critics Circle, who’ve got together in their circle and decided that Saoirse Ronan, Colin Farrell and Michael Fassbender are all British.… Read More Trolling The Brits For Lolz

The Old, Old Story

From two newspaper articles over the last twenty-four hours. The Derry Journal reporting on the opinions held in 1972 by the British army general, Sir Harry Tuzo, GOC (general-officer-commanding) the British Occupation Forces in Ireland from 1971-73, and a vigorous opponent of a negotiated settlement between the (Provisional) Republican Movement and the UK, on the character of the Irish people:… Read More The Old, Old Story

How The Irish Government Covered Up The Murder Of An Irish Citizen

Forty-seven year old Séamus Ludlow, a quiet, unassuming life-long bachelor, was something of a man of habit. On the afternoon of Saturday the 1st of May 1976, he left his place of work, a timbers’ merchants in Ravensdale, County Louth, where he was employed with his brother-in-law, Tommy Fox, and headed to his family home… Read More How The Irish Government Covered Up The Murder Of An Irish Citizen

The British Attempted To Defeat The UDA? The British Were The UDA!

Mhairi Black MP, the left-wing political poster-child of the SNP, writing in Scotland’s pro-independence National newspaper, explaining her opposition to Britain’s decision to launch token air strikes against the Islamic State in Syria: “Can you imagine if we had applied the logic we are applying to Syria to Ireland during the Troubles? If in our attempt… Read More The British Attempted To Defeat The UDA? The British Were The UDA!

The British Army In Ireland: Murder, Mayhem And Madness

From the legendary investigative journalist, Duncan Campbell,  a series of articles written for the New Statesman magazine in May 1984, describing the testimony of the former UK military intelligence officer, Captain Fred Holroyd, who was one of the first “insiders” to lift the lid on Britain’s “Dirty War” in Ireland. The three pieces from the publication’s archives cover… Read More The British Army In Ireland: Murder, Mayhem And Madness

Britain’s Bloody Sunday Deniers

On the afternoon of Sunday the 30th of January 1972 soldiers from the British Parachute Regiment, one of the more fearsome UK military units fighting the insurgency in the north-east of Ireland, attacked a civil rights march in the city of Derry, killing or fatally wounding fourteen civilians and injuring two dozen more in an event the international… Read More Britain’s Bloody Sunday Deniers