The Continuity IRA’s Hollow Show Of Strength In Lurgan

    So the (Continuity) Irish Republican Army is making minor headlines again following the publication of several rather indistinct photos on the Facebook Page of Republican Sinn Féin, the guerilla grouping’s political wing, showing two armed Volunteers posing in various locations around Kilwilkie, a sprawling housing estate in the town of Lurgan. This largely Nationalist enclave in north Armagh was the… Read More The Continuity IRA’s Hollow Show Of Strength In Lurgan

Britain’s Very Own Own Crimea In Ireland

Military jeeps driven by masked men wearing combat fatigues drive through the darkened streets of a city while hysterical crowds scream “Bring out the guns!” before confronting local paramilitary police. A week later over a hundred masked and uniformed men invade a local community, ransack homes, setting some on fire, driving people onto the streets… Read More Britain’s Very Own Own Crimea In Ireland

Death Squad Britain – The Past That Won’t Stay Hidden

Regular readers of An Sionnach Fionn will know how many times we have examined in detail the activities of Britain’s various official and unofficial forces participating in its thirty year long counter-insurgency war against the Irish Republican Army and others in Ireland. Of the official forces perhaps the most infamous have been the covert units… Read More Death Squad Britain – The Past That Won’t Stay Hidden

Margaret Thatcher – She Came, She Saw, She Failed

As a citizen of Ireland there is only one Margaret Thatcher that I remember. From the archives of the Guardian newspaper: “Margaret Thatcher horrified her advisers when she recommended that the government should revive the memory of Oliver Cromwell – dubbed the butcher of Ireland – and encourage tens of thousands of Catholics to leave… Read More Margaret Thatcher – She Came, She Saw, She Failed

More Accounts Of Death Squad Britain

Veteran Irish journalist and author Ed Moloney and his colleague Bob Mitchell continue their investigations into the Military Reaction Force (MRF), a British Army death squad that operated in the north-east of Ireland during the early 1970s. Its notoriety and reckless nature (with carloads of heavily armed undercover soldiers carrying out random drive-by shootings of the civilian populace in the city… Read More More Accounts Of Death Squad Britain

Britain’s War In Ireland – Learning The Lessons

The Irish journalist and author Finian Cunningham examines the conflict in the north-east of Ireland during the late 1960s and early ‘70s and draws some lessons in relation to France’s present military intervention in Mali. His description of the origins and early years of the Northern War are particularly noteworthy: “This week sees the anniversary… Read More Britain’s War In Ireland – Learning The Lessons

The McGurk Bar Massacre – British Bombers In Irish Cities

Two reviews of the ground-breaking investigative book “The McGurk’s Bar Bombing: Collusion, Cover–Up and a Campaign for Truth” by the Irish author and campaigner Ciarán Mac Airt. The first is from the news and current affairs blog Its A Political World and the second is from the journalist and screenwriter Viv Young in The New York Journal of Books. For more on the… Read More The McGurk Bar Massacre – British Bombers In Irish Cities

Counter-Gangs – The Origins Of British Terrorism In Ireland

I’ve devoted considerable space on An Sionnach Fionn to cataloguing Britain’s dirty war in Ireland highlighting a wide range of evidence gathered over the last forty years by human rights organisations, journalists and historians. Now the independent news and current affairs site Spinwatch has worked with the Pat Finucane Centre to publish a new study, “COUNTER-GANGS: A history of undercover military units in Northern… Read More Counter-Gangs – The Origins Of British Terrorism In Ireland

“Northern Ireland” 48% Protestant, 47% British – So Why Is Ireland Still Partitioned?

Several weeks ago the elected members of Belfast City Council voted by a majority to end the year-round flying of the British national flag from the rooftop of the city hall. Councillors agreed instead to reduce the number of days the flag was flown to certain “designated days”; essentially those periods during the year held to be of special significance to the British Unionist… Read More “Northern Ireland” 48% Protestant, 47% British – So Why Is Ireland Still Partitioned?