Condemning Rebellion In Occupied France And Ireland

The Roman Catholic hierarchy with John Redmond MP, the leader of the Irish Nationalist establishment, 1912

Today’s Irish Times newspaper carries a deeply offensive article examining the period of 1939-45 in France and what the author of the piece characterizes as the “armed rebellion” of the French Resistance against the mandated administration of the country by Nazi Germany and it’s collaborationist partners during World War II. In particular the journalist questions … Continue reading

Some Irish Stories

The 1912 Fianna Éireann Ard-Fheis with a large Gal Gréine banner in the background

A few quick links to articles and posts that I have enjoyed over the last week or so. First up is this piece from the excellent historical website, The Cricket Bat That Died For Ireland, featuring a series of photos taken in a British concentration camp in Ireland during the most important period of the … Continue reading

Celebrating The Irish Who Fought Against Slavery

The De Móinbhíol or Mansfield family of Skerries, Ireland, with a monument mentioning two former Confederate officers of the American Civil War

As Ireland’s plutocratic old guard grinds its teeth in anxiety at the approaching 2016 centenary of the Easter Rising, the insurrection that heralded the Irish Revolution in 1916, some from the Neo-Ascendancy class have sought solace in rival historical commemorations where they can express their true ideological loyalties (and perhaps true political identity too). Dismissing the remembrance of a risen people they have plunged into the records of the industrial-scale … Continue reading

From Ireland To Greece A Policy Of Divide And Conquer

The Irish National Army (Free State Army) bombards the Four Courts using British-supplied artillery and ammunition, the Battle of Dublin, 1922

Reading this account by Ed Vulliamy and Helena Smith in the Observer newspaper of Britain’s fermenting of the civil war in Greece from 1946 to 1949 I was struck by some parallels with the British government’s instigation of the internecine conflict in Ireland between the established Irish Republic and the usurping Irish Free State in … Continue reading

Chronology of Irish History 1919–1923

Volunteers of the Irish Republican Army move through Grafton Street, the Battle of Dublin, 1922

Over the last year I’ve been contacted by a few people enquiring if I knew anything about the disappearance of the web-based “Chronology of Irish History 1919 –1923”, an invaluable month-by-month account of significant events from the War of Independence and Civil War created by Séamus Fox of Dublin City University and maintained on the DCU servers … Continue reading

The Revolution Will Not Be Televised

Photo of Mae Burke, Eithne Coyle and Linda Kearns, Cumann na mBan revolutionaries, taken shortly after they escaped from a British POW camp, in Carlow, Ireland 1921

I’m not quite sure if the political establishment in Ireland is embarrassed, ashamed or terrified by the 2016 centenary of the Irish Revolution but there is definitely something amiss in the way they are reacting to the approaching anniversary of the Easter Rising of 1916. After four years of stonewalling from various representatives of the Fine Gael-Labour coalition the … Continue reading

The Irish Slave Mind

Native African workers in the Belgian Congo, men, women and children with their hands cut off by their European masters

Given some recent conversations on ASF I thought this article might be of interest to a number of readers. It discusses the much vexed issue of the Irish “slave mentality”, the aberrant mindset found in a significant number of people on this island nation who place no value in their own linguistic, cultural or national identity but who instead wish to emulate the identity … Continue reading

The Irish Famine Of 1925

The buildings of the Four Courts devastated by the British-supplied artillery used by the Irish National Army (Free State Army), the Battle of Dublin, 1922

These are the people, the right-wing Nationalist forces, that initiated and won the counter-revolutionary civil war of 1921-23 and this is the conservative Irish Free State they replaced the liberal Irish Republic with. From an article by Fin Dwyer of the excellent Irish History Podcast: “In the early 1920s Ireland was in a ruinous state. … Continue reading

Ireland’s Great Betrayal

British troops pose with an Irish Tricolour captured from Pro-Treaty and Anti-Treaty Irish Republican Army units following the Battle of Pettigo and Belleek in late May and early June of 1922

What date marks the end of Ireland’s War of Independence? It is a question more debated than you might think (along with the commencement of the struggle itself, with both Cork and Donegal claiming the “first shots” of the conflict in 1918, well ahead of the usual date of January 1919). If you were to follow the conventional … Continue reading

John Redmond, From Gun-Running To Civil War

The Roman Catholic hierarchy with John Redmond MP, the leader of the Irish Nationalist establishment, 1912

In recent years the historical figure of John Redmond MP, the head of the Irish Parliamentary Party (IPP) and self-declared “leader of Nationalist Ireland” during the early stages of the 1916-23 revolution, has been elevated to the status of a contra-republican icon by the Neo-Unionist tendency of Irish journalism and politics. In the run-up to … Continue reading

The Scandal Of The 1916 Battlefield Quarter

The GPO, Dublin, Destroyed By The British Occupation Forces, 1916

As Dublin City Council continues to debate and prevaricate over saving what is left of the capital’s 1916 Battlefield Quarter below is a timely reminder of the background to the ongoing scandal. Would the French ponder the preservation of the Bastille or the Americans the safeguarding of Bunker Hill? Of course not but here in … Continue reading

The Irish Republic

Photo of Mae Burke, Eithne Coyle and Linda Kearns, Cumann na mBan revolutionaries, taken shortly after they escaped from a British POW camp, in Carlow, Ireland 1921

I remember writing an essay many years ago where I stated that the Irish revolution was the making of Ireland’s language revival and the Irish counter-revolution was its breaking. Nothing in the last ten years has altered that opinion. The internecine victory of the reactionary forces of the old Catholic Nationalist bourgeoisie in 1923, with … Continue reading

  • blog awards ireland Nominated 2013: Best Politics, Personal Blog Categories; Best Blog Post
  • blog awards ireland

    Nominated 2014: Best News, Current Affairs, Politics, Mobile Blog Categories; Best Blog Post

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