No Taxation Without Representation!

Local Property Tax form and booklet - no taxation without representation!
Local Property Tax form and booklet – no taxation without representation!

So the documentation for the latest state-sponsored extortion racket has arrived in the post under the guise of the Local Property Tax. However the information is entirely in the English language. I’m sorry, but where is the Irish language text? What happened to the regulations in force under the Official Languages Act of 2003? Where is the bilingual Irish and English documentation that has become the norm over the last decade? Even the website of the Property Services Regulatory Authority is in English only.

Is that legal?

Irish-speakers are tax-payers too. So, if for no other reason, when it comes to the Local Property Tax – no taxation without representation!

The Property Services Regulatory Authority - but where is the Irish?
The Property Services Regulatory Authority – but where is the Irish?

Meanwhile, the next venue for the Pirates of Taxation? From the NAMA Wine Lake:

Might the government reach into your deposit accounts for a levy?

…in the past week Labour’s chairman of the Oireachtas finance committee Ciaran Lynch and Fine Gael’s jobs minister, Richard Bruton have both indicated that a levy on sub-€100k could be on the cards despite the existence of the sub-€100k guarantee. There seems to be a feeling that the guarantee only applies if a bank is allowed to go bust, but if there was an intervention before the bank was actually liquidated then all depositors including those with sub-€100k deposits would face “levies” despite the existence of the deposit guarantee scheme. Minister Bruton said on radio today that Cyprus imposing a levy on sub-€100k deposits was “in the remit” of the Cypriot government. The experience of this Government taking €1.88bn from private pensions between 2011-2014 to fund the Jobs Initiative (mostly the reduction in VAT on certain services), would also make you ill-at-ease that the Government would regard as sacred the guarantee for sub-€100k depositors.”

Read the full article for the background to the story (and to understand why the sale of cash-boxes and home-safes in Ireland have risen significantly over the last two years).

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5 comments

  1. It’s interesting that here in the US, the government will often print voting material in languages besides English, even though there is no legal reason to do so and it, obviously drives up costs. Yet, in your neck of the woods, the government is required to do so and refuses.

    Part of me is somewhat befuddled by the fact that the state won’t print items in Irish; doing so would require an expansion of government (the need to hire people who speak the language, for example), which is something bureaucrats typically relish. To turn their backs on this opportunity to grow government underscores a great disdain for the Irish language and its adherents.

      1. @Marconatrix, good question. Since 2003, by law, state documentation must be provided in Irish and English or bilingually in both languages. Since these forms were sent to every property owner in Ireland they should have been in a bilingual form. The aim of the 2003 Act is to ensure that Irish-speaking citizens do not have to go to extra measures to receive the same service as their English-speaking peers.

        No one should need to email or phone the Revenue Commissioners to receive Irish language forms. They should be included by default.

        By law the Irish language is the national and first official language of the state (with a superior constitutional position) while English is merely a second official language.

        Yet Irish-speaking citizens through arguably unconstitutional actions like this are placed in an inferior position to English-speaking citizens in the state.

        Another point to note. The form LPT1 makes reference to contact numbers for “(ROI)” and “(outside ROI)”. This “ROI” is presumably the “Republic of Ireland”. However no such place exists under Irish law. The name of the state in the Constitution of Ireland is “Éire” (in Irish) or “Ireland” (in English). The Irish courts do not recognise a “ROI/Republic of Ireland/Irish Republic/Southern Ireland/South of Ireland” as a legal entity and have ruled as such.

        What does it say about the employees of a state that they cannot even use its correct legal name?

    1. @Cotton, I agree absolutely. The constitution of the state makes it clear that the Irish language is the national and first official language of the state (with a superior constitutional position) while English is merely a second official language. Yet English is the default language of the state and Irish is frequently ignored. Modern Ireland is a quite bizarre example of a post-colonial state with all the neuroses and inferiority complexes that go with it. As I wrote, Ireland is the poster-child of the Stockholm Syndrome.

  2. Do chonacsa “Cáin agus Custaim na hÉireann” scríte ansan … gan dobht tá Gaeilge acu. Dá mbeadh a chuile daoine ag scríobh “Gaeilge?” orthu agus a gcur thar n-ais iad … ???

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