The Long War

AVolunteer of the Derry Brigade of the Irish Republican Army armed with an M60 general-purpose machine gun
A Volunteer of the Derry Brigade of the Irish Republican Army armed with an American-supplied M60 general-purpose machine gun, Derry City, British Occupied North of Ireland, 1978

The Long War (An Cogadh Fada), Causality List 1969-2001

It is important to recognise that this list is restricted in scope and years of application. Deaths from the early years of the conflict or so-called “Troubles” beginning in 1966 are not included nor are deaths after 2001. The Army Council and GHQ Staff of the (Provisional) Irish Republican Army announced an official end to its military struggle on the 28th of July 2005 (the organisation came into being with the formation of a “Provisional” Army Council in December 1969 and was in a state of ceasefire from the 19th of July 1997).

The general casualty lists for the (Provisional) Irish Republican Army, the British Occupation Forces, the British Terror Factions and the civilian population vary greatly according to sources, however the figures below are regarded as the closet in accuracy.

276-294 killed: members of the (Provisional) Irish Republican Army (incl. Cumann na mBan, Fianna Éireann, etc.) (excl. OIRA, INLA, IPLO, etc.)

1049 killed: members of the British Occupation Forces (incl. British military and security personnel outside of Ireland)

151-154 killed: members of the British Terror Factions

1855+ killed: members of the civilian population in Ireland, Britain and mainland Europe 

The number of civilian fatalities by organisation, (P)IRA versus BOF and BTF:

621-644: members of the civilian population killed by the (Provisional) Irish Republican Army

188-200: members of the civilian population killed by the British Occupation Forces

600+: members of the civilian population killed by the British Terror Factions 

The number of fatalities caused by political affiliation:

2057: killed by the Irish Republican Forces/Insurgents

1382: killed by the British Occupation Forces and allied British Terror Factions

82: killed by unknown/unidentified persons/organisations

5: killed by Óglaigh na hÉireann (Defence Forces Ireland) / An Garda Síochána (the Civic Guard or Irish police) 

Percentage breakdown of fatalities caused by Irish Republican Forces/Insurgents: the Provisional Irish Republican Army (PIRA), Official Irish Republican Army (OIRA), Irish National Liberation Army (INLA), Irish Peoples Liberation Organisation (IPLO), etc.

52% were members of the British Occupation Forces

35% were Civilians (incl. collateral casualties, etc.)

9% were members of the Irish Republican Forces/Insurgents (incl. “friendly fire” casualties, etc.)

2.7% were members of the British Terror Factions

0.4% were members of Óglaigh na hÉireann (Defence Forces Ireland) / An Garda Síochána (the Civic Guard or Irish police) 

Percentage breakdown of fatalities caused by British Occupation Forces: British Armed Forces (BAF) incl. Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR), Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC), etc.

51.5% were Civilians (incl. collateral casualties, etc.)

39.9% were members of the Irish Republican Forces/Insurgents

4.9% were members of the British Terror Factions (incl. “friendly fire” casualties, etc.)

3.5% were members of the British Occupation Forces (“friendly fire” casualties) 

Percentage breakdown of fatalities caused by legal and illegal British Terror Factions: the Ulster Defence Association-Ulster Freedom Fighters (UDA-UFF), the Ulster Volunteer Forces (UVF), Red Hand Commando (RHC), Loyalist Volunteer Force (LVF), etc.

85.4% were Civilians (incl. collateral casualties, etc.)

9% were members of the British Terror Factions (incl. “friendly fire” casualties, etc.)

4% were members of the Irish Republican Forces/Insurgents

1.3% were members of the British Occupation Forces (incl. “friendly fire” casualties, etc.)

In total some 100,000 people were wounded or injured during the course of the conflict in western Europe. Up to 20,000 people served as political prisoners or were held in enforced detention in Ireland, Britain and elsewhere.

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