Current Affairs Politics

Nigel, Nigel, Nigel – Out, Out, Out

English: Nigel Farage.
Nigel Farage

Scottish blogger James Kelly calls it right as he examines the ignoble retreat of the UKIP leader Nigel Farage from his expedition to Scotland. From the International Business Times:

“Farage thought it would be a great line to say that his tormentors want the “Union Jack… to be extinguished from Scotland forever”. Now I dare say that sort of thing goes down a storm in parts of England where Ukip are trying to whip up suspicion of ‘anti-British immigrants’, but here’s the thing, Nigel – we’re in the middle of a democratic process that could lead to Scotland becoming an independent country. And yes, that would mean for straightforward practical reasons that the Union Jack will no longer be our national flag. In other words, what Farage is charging the protesters with doing is supporting a Yes vote in the referendum.”

9 comments on “Nigel, Nigel, Nigel – Out, Out, Out

  1. Peadar Ó Lorcáin

    Sionnach: I don’t know about all this business about Nigel F canvassing in Scotland but isn’t it reasonable to question the notion of an “independent” Scotland within a proto-federal European Union? Personally I think I’d like us to leave the EU but believe when the UK leaves our own economy’s twenty-year depression (2008-c.2030) is a certainty! Áth mór, Peadar

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    • Personally I’ve gone from being a strong advocate and believer in the EU to being extremely cautious about its purpose and motivations. Lisbon II changed everything for me and what has happened in Greece, Spain, Italy, Portugal and of course here has confirmed my growing worries about the anti-democratic culture of the Brussels bureaucracy.

      I agree that the UK out of the EU will have a major effect on our economy – to say the least.

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  2. Peadar Ó Lorcáin

    Absolutely! I remember buying large state tri-colour and EC flags in Clerys before the 1992(?) Maastricht treaty – I was always a europhile and anglophile (not anglocentric) and believed European membership was good for the economy but perhaps like Bertie-era confessional groupthink, I never believed or listened to arguments about dissolution of sovereignty: here, it went so bad that one of the most vociferous of the Irish European Unionist Parties, FF, volunteered to euthanise the native sugar industry, only for the Commission to say later it was unnecessary – can’t make this stuff up! – Anyway, FF/FG/Labour are like politicians from 19th century Missouri – a federal union was always the bigger plan – read about the philosophers of European Unionism: Jean Monet, Robert Schuman et al – indeed proof of failure of Irish European Unionist politics in that Irish are now 40yrs since membership are emigrating to anglophone / commonwealth countries! Then of course Gaelophobes like Tom Garvin of UCD and one Prof of Genetics at TCD (can’t remember his name – was on ‘Miriam Meets’ in last few months) will shout about historical and therefore current economic problems are exaserbated by what regular caller Limerick ‘Joe’ on 4fm calls the “Irish language nazis” — fantastic! Perhaps that suits the Irish administration just fine: divide and rule! PAX EUROPAEA! – Beir bua, Peadar

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    • A very similar experience to my own. A federal EU would of course be simply a plaything for the larger states and the smaller ones would become the sources of revenue, service-level employees and leisure homes. It seems we may have realised that too late. Our own political establishment, rather than rejecting such an iniquitous system, just wish to join those at the top. Every nation has its Uncle Toms.

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  3. hoboroad

    Europe has not worked as a political construct. But nor has the United Kingdom. Most of Ireland has long gone. Scotland is girding its loins to go. Wales and Northern Ireland are special cases, but are winning progressively more autonomy. One day their representation at Westminster will be diminished.

    So says Simon Jenkins in a piece for the Evening Standard. He argues that London should leave not only the EU but the UK as well. That Londons two main employers are finance and leisure. What he saying is London can’t afford to be dragged down by the rest of England.

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    • A view quite a few south-east English share. But then where would the London metropolitan elite have their weekend holiday homes if not in Cornwall and the Lake District? 😉

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  4. Peadar Ó Lorcáin

    Sionnach: found that link for TCD’s David McConnell – url.ie/hfpd – Some people can’t seem to appreciate that’s it’s not the fault of the language that politicians – or even abusive religious – may have spoken/speak Irish but that’s not the fault of the language! Is it the German language’s fault that genocide was committed by German speakers?! ‘Free State Ireland’ and the modern EU protectorate have poorly served the language our ancestors bequeathed to us! – Peadar

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    • I will have a listen to that later. The reply of course is should we blame English-speakers in Ireland as a whole for the persecution and decline of the indigenous language of Ireland? If Irish-speakers are a “legitimate target” for some politicians and the media are English-speakers then a legitimate target in return? Given the number of monolingual Irish-speakers in 1923 and the number in 2013 (from c.20,000 to zero?) should we blame the Daorstát Éireann for “genocide” and act accordingly?

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  5. Peadar Ó Lorcáin

    Sionnach: thanks very much for that — I think it’s 26m:20s into the mp3 file (can’t remember) that the Garvin-proselytiser makes his comment to unmoved response from the Alexandra-school girl and mother!– the only answer I could give is that all Irish people (where -ever they live) have themselves to blame if the language dies and recognise (unlike those in Teach Laighean with the ‘gathering’ tourist-scam) that language (English and Irish) is central to any notion of ” Irish culture” – I wasn’t though trying to be flippant (not saying you were, mind!) about ‘genocide’ but yeah! Irish politicians are of their time (1918/2013, good/bad) – but without visionary leadership in this confessional-conformist-state everything is screwed! – Peadar

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