Current Affairs Politics

Britain’s Armed Shame

In Afghanistan soldiers of the RIR, a British Army unit, pose as UVF terrorists in front of an extremist flag
In Afghanistan soldiers of the RIR, a British Army unit, pose as UVF terrorists in front of an extremist flag
In Ireland gunmen of the UVF, a British terrorist organisation, pose in front of an extremist flag
In Ireland gunmen of the UVF, a British terrorist organisation, pose in front of an extremist flag
Members of the EDL, a Far Right movement in Britain, display their support for the British terror factions in Ireland
Members of the EDL, a Far Right movement in Britain, display their support for the British terror factions in Ireland

In Ireland the British separatist terrorists of the state-controlled UVF faction pose for the cameras

In Ireland the British separatist terrorists of the state-controlled UVF faction pose for the cameras

Some time ago I published photos on An Sionnach Fionn featuring British soldiers serving in Afghanistan making Nazi salutes while posing in front of a British terrorist flag. Last week it was taken up by the news media in Britain, in particular the Daily Mail and Mail on Sunday newspapers. Now I have images from the so-called Royal Irish Regiment or RIR showing further displays of support for the separatist terror factions of the British Unionist minority community in Ireland. In addition there are photographs showing members of the British Army wearing the regalia of the Orange Order, an oath-bound Protestant fundamentalist organisation violently opposed to the Roman Catholic faith in Ireland, Britain and elsewhere.

During Britain’s decades long counter-insurgency war against the Irish Republican Army many observers believe that there was frequently little to distinguish between British soldier and British gunman, British police officer and British car bomber and witnessing members of the British Armed Forces readily associating themselves with terrorist gangs who inflicted untold misery in Ireland simply adds to that belief. Furthermore the visible proof that the British Army and government permits a sectarian and racist movement like the Orange Order, a “British KKK”, to openly recruit and organise in the ranks of the military says much about Britain’s role in the war that disfigured the north-western edge of Europe.

A British soldier in Afghanistan poses as a British terrorist in Ireland, complete with balaclava mask and RPG7 rocket-launcher
A British soldier in Afghanistan poses as a British terrorist in Ireland, complete with balaclava mask and RPG7 rocket-launcher
Masked British terrorists in Ireland stage a propaganda event for the camera, one holds an RPG7 rocket-launcher
Masked British terrorists in Ireland stage a propaganda event for the camera, one holds an RPG7 rocket-launcher

A British soldier in Afghanistan poses in front of several British terrorist and extremist flags celebrating the conflict in the north-east of Ireland

A British soldier in Afghanistan poses in front of several British terrorist and extremist flags celebrating the conflict in the north-east of Ireland
In Afghanistan soldiers of the British Army wear the regalia of the Orange Order, a Protestant fundamentalist organisation, which promotes the hatred of Roman Catholics in Ireland and elsewhere
In Afghanistan soldiers of the British Army wear the regalia of the Orange Order, a Protestant fundamentalist organisation, which promotes the hatred of Roman Catholics in Ireland and elsewhere

British soldiers in Afghanistan display Orange Order emblems and British Unionist flags

British soldiers in Afghanistan display their racist and sectarian Orange Order emblems and British Unionist flags
British terrorists in Ireland, members of the UVF, in a propaganda pose for the cameras
British terrorists in Ireland, members of the UVF, in a propaganda pose for the cameras
From a British Army base in Afghanistan, a sign mocking Bobby Sands, the Irish political prisoner and elected member of the British parliament who died on hunger strike in 1981
From a British Army base in Afghanistan, a sign mocking Bobby Sands, the Irish political prisoner and elected member of the British parliament who died on hunger strike in 1981
British soldiers of the RIR unit with a flag supporting the anti-Catholic and Protestant fundamentalist Orange Order in Drumcree, 2002
British soldiers of the RIR unit with a flag supporting the anti-Catholic and Protestant fundamentalist Orange Order in Drumcree, 2002
British troops pose in front of a wall decorated with British terrorist symbols during the conflict in the British Occupied North of Ireland
British troops pose in front of a wall decorated with British terrorist symbols during the conflict in the British Occupied North of Ireland

3 comments on “Britain’s Armed Shame

  1. NMunsterman

    No surprises there – including the fact that they have difficulty with basic information such as the year in which Bobby Sands died along with 9 fellow Hunger Strikers in 1981 – and not 1982 as incorrectly written up on the British Army base in Afghanistan.

    Useful idiots indeed – mere pawns of the British and Unionist establishments.

    I wonder do they know that unionists will be the minority in the north-east of the country already by 2020 – or are there too many digits in that number for them ? Or has anyone bothered to tell them, as they are now surplus to requirements, that London sold them down the river – without a paddle or a veto over
    Irish Re-unification – at the GFA ?
    They can’t even get their own flag up on Belfast City Hall on their own terms.

  2. I don’t know about british catholics. They certainly hate irish catholics but your’e forgetting any hatred of the irish by recuscant catholics in england and scotland

  3. Athbhlagáladh é seo ar seachranaidhe1.

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: