High Rise Dublin Or Stupid Knows Stupid

Speaking of inferiority complexes or falsely equating anything “foreign” with modernity, here is more of the same in the Comments’ section under a report by thejournal.ie on Dublin City Council’s concerns about the effects of high-rise development on our liveable, human-scale national capital:

Ricky Spanish # 
The building standards should the main issue not the height. Dublin is already too spread out. Time to build up like every other proper city does.

ben1 #
So stupid of course you should build up.. They don’t want Dublin noticed as a capital city around the world… High rise = power

The Guru2 # 
Give it 20 years and we might have moved into the 20th century. Love how their excuse is that they don’t want to cast a shadow. Not sure if they’re aware that you require sun for that to happen.

Fake Avast #
Poor Germans, Dutch, French, Italian or Spanish – they have to live oppressed life without sun in block-of-flat ghettos, no wonder they migrate to our wisely designed Viking cities here.

Tweety McTweeter #
Surely the ever expanding sprawl is more of an issue than the issue of over shading from high buildings. Why does nearly every other city of Dublins size allow tall buildings? Are they all making a terrible mistake?

But I’m sure that these politicians know better than the city planners of every major city in the world…

Fred Johnson #
Indeed. It’s this peculiar Irish thing, probably has its roots from the time we lived in little cottages and the landlord looked down on us from the “big house”. Can’t have that fella gettin ahead of himself by living up there in the clouds now can we? It’s weird, pathetic…

Fred Johnson #8
Absolute muppets. Why are People before profit and the greens, with a whopping 5% of the national vote, dictating anything related to the economic heart of this country? We are just shooting ourselves in the foot and making housing unaffordable for all but the welfare class.

Alien8 #
while the rest of the world grows up, we are happy to be left behind… if these people were in New York at the turn of the last century (also an architecturally beautiful low rise city in the 1800s), they would ensure it would never be able to grow into the place it is.

Vincent Wallace #
Sure why are we surprised. Every other city was putting down rail and trams and we took them up. Backwards Ireland again!

Fjordie #
Trying to keep us in the dark ages with their height restrictions. They should remove all restrictions outside residential areas. We need a downtown area like other ‘proper ‘ cities..

The scariest thing about the above views is that these semi-literate, historically ignorant, socially elitist wannabe cosmopolitans actually have the vote. Oh well, back to my green republican roots…

Advertisements

7 comments

  1. Washington DC does not have any high rise buildings. I suppose the American capital is backwards too! 🙂

  2. +1 An Sionnach Fionn. True cosmopolitanism is something that encourages diversity, not a fake homogeneity. One of the genuine pleasures about this island is still being able to come back from abroad and see how everything is on a human scale. I’ve no problem with Manhattan, it’s fantastic, but it’s Manhattan. London likewise. Liverpool is a fascinating example because compared to Dublin some of the 19th C buildings are double the height which gives it a weirdly continental feel. But Dublin, Cork, Galway, Belfast, Limerick are all the better for being at the level they are.
    The tweet or comment about ‘welfare class’ says it all too.

    1. Indeed. One goes to those places exactly to experience their uniqueness, just as people come here to experience ours. New York City is great, but being there in the summer and using the “urban canyons” made by the skyscrapers one longs for the open blue skies of home. That is why there is so much fuss over Central Park at the moment and the threat it faces from the new generation of high-rise buildings that developers want to build around its periphery. They will destroy it.

      Yep, it was a Comment and one representing the pretty clear subtext to all this. They might build their Irish high-rises but it won’t be for the benefit of the plebian masses. Instead the usual suspects will tower above them, quite literally, a physical as well as financial barrier. As in London and New York.

Comments are closed.