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Discussing Irish Politics – Or The Lack Thereof

Proclamation of the Irish Republic Dublin Ireland 24th April 1916
A copy of the Proclamation of the Irish Republic being read by Dr. Edward McWeeney, Dublin, Ireland, 24th April 1916

Some interesting views expressed underneath a post by WorldByStorm over on the Cedar Lounge Revolution: Do Irish people instinctively understand that Irish unity, independence and sovereignty is in their vital interest? The answer of course is how could they when so much of the Dublin media establishment actively promotes a disdain for all of the above? And whether we like it or not public opinion in Ireland, both about ourselves and about the world, is filtered through that self-censoring and self-interested prism. Even in this (still early) age of the internet.

(Also check out this related discussion, Left Activism… A Paradox)

KAT Kill All Taigs and FAP Fuck All Papists
British Nationalism: KAT “Kill All Taigs” (Irish Roman Catholics), FAP “Fuck All Papists” (Roman Catholics) (Íomhá: Moochin Photoman)

Bangordub casts a cold eye on some aspects of the British Unionist tradition in the north-east of the country over on We In Coming Days. Ireland is in the lead-up to the Glorious Twelfth and soon the bonfires will be burning for Eleventh Night – and with them plenty of Irish national flags and quite a few effigies. But what does it mean?

Talking of Unionism Fitzjames Horse offers a caustic view of that darling of the pro-Union media in Ireland and Britain, Naomi Long MP of the Alliance Party. He draws attention to the rarely discussed main financial backer of Belfast’s Unionist-lite party, the British-based Rowntree Trust, the mere mention of which is enough to send the average AP member into full-on Scientology mode.

2 comments on “Discussing Irish Politics – Or The Lack Thereof

  1. A couple of classy young ladies there in the second photo. Unfortunately, I’m sure their parents are very proud, and that’s the problem.

    • Indeed. Unfortunately “FAP” and “KAT” aren’t just idle abbreviations, kids showing off or being rebellious. They reflect wider attitudes in some British Unionist communities in the north-east corner of Ireland. The photo was taken at a major Unionist event, a gathering of the Orange Order and their supporters/families during July 12th “celebrations”. The term is all too common at such things, even the most astutely stewarded.

      The problem is part of wider issues for Unionism in Ireland. Racism of all types is the norm in too many areas.

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