The National Flag Of Ireland Flies Over Stormont

Ireland's national flag flies over the north-eastern assembly building at Stormont The Green, White and Orange flies over the north-east’s regional assembly building at Stormont. We are living in the end days of the British colony in Ireland, whether others wish it or not.

Update 09.062015: The 1916 Societies claim responsibility for the flag-hoisting. Well done to all.

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13 comments

    1. the petition got about 30,000 signatures –

      Glasgow’s orangefest was practically deserted yesterday – probably due to bad weather and the petition. Some people are wondering whether Glaswegians had opted to just silently boycott it

      No Attender instead of No Surrender

      1. That’s good news then, and the Labour councillors will pay for this come the next election. There was some sort of a stay-away campaign, but I’ve no idea how well if at all it was organised. Perhaps it didn’t need to be organised, even better!

  1. Better late then never. Only nearly 100 years after the same flag flew over Dublin Post Office, in 1916.

  2. Easter Sunday 1916 from my grandfather’s witness statement
    “There were nearly 200 Volunteers there. I was told that the schoolmaster at Bweeing put out a green, white and gold flag that day. I had seen one before that in 1915 at Bandon Railway station carried by the boys of a hurling or football team on the train. They were waving it in the faces of the police on duty. “

  3. And, of course, there has been a huge over-reaction to this by both Unionists and Nationalists, to something which was obviously intended to be a joke. It doesn’t negate the need for a coherent argument to be put in favour of a United Ireland, particularly by those like Sinn Fein who are the chief cheerleaders for it : but in the words of the old song, “I’m still waiting.”

    1. Tommy Makem on Caitlín Ní Houlihan

      And from the play by Yeats and Gregory

      “It is a hard service they take that help me. Many that are red-cheeked now will be pale-cheeked; many that have been free to walk the hills and the bogs and the rushes will be sent to walk hard streets in far countries; many a good plan will be broken; many that have gathered money will not stay to spend it; many a child will be born, and there will be no father at its christening to give it a name. They that had red cheeks will have pale cheeks for my sake; and for all that, they will think they are well paid.” 
      ― W.B. Yeats, Cathleen Ni Houlihan

      I had to learn this for a local drama group performance of the play when I was 14 yrs Every now and then i try to recall this line which I found the most difficult to remember at the time

      1. Apologies there
        I was certain that I’d sent a link
        Don’t wish to commandeer the blog !!

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